This Jesus Harold - S. Paisley

Precious Seed

Paperback, 86pp.
Published by Gospel Folio Press, 304 Killaly St. W., Port Colborne, ON L3K 6A6.
Price: £6.99  
ISBN 978-1926765-20-4.


This Jesus is a study of some of the more prominent names and titles of the Lord Jesus. These include Emmanuel, Jesus, Christ Jesus, The Lord Jesus Christ and The Son of Man, to name a few. The final section of the book also considers the title Alpha and Omega where the author proceeds to briefly reflect on a name or title of the Lord Jesus under every letter of the alphabet (e.g., ‘A’ – Author, ‘B’ – Beloved).


Although these are by no means detailed expositions, Paisley lays down the primary principles with regard to each name or title, thus providing plenty to provoke the mind to thought and further meditation. In this regard, the primary purpose of the book - to move hearts ‘to praise the Father and the Son by the Holy Spirit’s power’ - has been met.


Given the brevity of most chapters it is not surprising that some of the author’s comments are not further expanded. This is disappointing, as some are most interesting! For example, it is suggested that the ‘two men’ of Acts chapter 1 verses 9-11 were in fact Enoch and Elijah, rather than angels, as commonly believed. Paisley states, ‘It would seem that being man, the most likely to speak of His coming in like manner, were two men’. Furthermore, it is stated that the phrase ‘filled with wisdom’ concerning the childhood of the Lord Jesus, Luke 2. 40, is explained by the fact that ‘He increased in His appreciation of all things He had created’.


Overall, the book is a most useful introduction to the clear distinctions scripture places on the similar, yet different, names and titles of the Lord Jesus, e.g., Jesus Christ and Christ Jesus. The book is very easy to read, and, due to the short chapters/sections, can also be read at different times without disturbing the flow of thought. As there is much to provoke to further study concerning the glories of our Lord and Saviour, this book is most interesting.


[Our thanks to Dan Rudge, Bracknell, UK, for this review]